poemimage

Where text meets image. Where the visual intersects the literary.

Tag: Paul Klee

‘Miro and Klee Influence a Painting’ by Tom Gannon Hamilton

Yes and the form once liberated from the laws of physics

and the conventions of decor can create its own ungrounded, untethered place

in the viewer’s imagination…

stimulating synaptic firing and creating new neuropathways

with much the same vitality as lyrical music and dance.

The discovery of, as well as through, Klee and Miro

thus frees the apprehending subject from the representational,

its associative shackles on the one hand, while on the other,

offering refuge

from the psychological desolation many people suffer

when confronted by pure abstraction.

My mother, forever painting under great tutelage:

Arthur Lismer, Kryunsic, Toppham-Brown,

introduced me to both Klee and Miro

before my soul-crushing experience of grade school.

I found as well in Calder’s mobiles, a similar approach to the form,

at once animated and authentic.

I like in your work, the agreement between image delineation and colour choices.

I too am drawn to the language of blue, an entire lexicon unto itself.

Its relationship to white and near-whites — eggshell, plaster, bone

in juxtaposition with material expressions of light such as mustard and yellow ochre,

generate a synergy of comfort for the viewer so the eye feels at home and lingers,

as one might on a desert retreat.

Founder/Curator/Host of the Toronto Urban Folk Art Salon, TG Hamilton has been published in numerous Canadian and international lit.reviews/anthologies. His poem suite El Marillo won 1st prize in the 2018 Big Pond Rumours Chapbook Contest; his book Panoptic (Aeolus House 2018) was nominated for a Pushcart Prize and the Gerald Lampert Award; The Mezzo Soprano Dines Alone was selected for the distinguished John B. Lee Signature Series (Hidden BrookPress 2020). Dr. Hamilton’s MA Thesis (Inside the Words 1984) and PhD dissertation (A Poetics of Possibility, 2001) reflect his lifelong passion for poetry.

Painting by Steven McCabe, done the other day. Water-soluble graphite pencil & acrylic paint + watercolour paint in an 8.5″ X 11″ sketchbook. The Naples Yellow turned ochre-ish blending with graphite.

 

 

Distance Swimming

circle

In her mirror

detail with green ball

She feels illumined by an accelerating process

blur all

Initiated by the 20th Century.

watery

A darkening fog.

the heroic ball and glove

Klee-song,

hand

Cocteau,

newly

de Chirico,

love

Arise from her in swirling, serpentine eddies. A ventriloquist.

angles

She unties a boat on the shore. The underground river.

final circle

Languages of illumining clarity speed into each other like blood in water,

watery

As vast and translucent as the Northern Lights.

final circle

 & For reasons both utilitarian and mythopoeic

watery

The face in the mirror anticipates leaping.

final circle

& Distance swimming through shadow-lands,

watery

Beneath the precipice of shallow, atomic time,

final circle

Within and without darkened chambers & coincidentally

watery

 Light reflecting upon ancient vials.

final circle

 & Our spines an unbroken chain of receptor cauldrons.

watery

& Her gift. The mirror.

zoom

Paul Klee catalogue (1951), Giorgio de Chirico painting ‘Song of Love’ (1914), photographic still from Jean Cocteau’s ‘Orphee’ (1950), pictured: Jean Marais  and Maria Casarès

Paul Klee and Ferdinand the Bull

 final ferdinand and klee image

Ferdinand the Bull only wanted to smell the flowers.

the-story-of-ferdinand-book-cover

My favourite book as a child. I found the story captivating and the ink drawings mesmerizing. I remember my mother in the sun-drenched living room where I would turn the pages over and over.

paul klee fairy tales

‘Fairy Tales’ by Paul Klee. Perhaps my favourite artist of all my favourites. Was Paul Klee so unlike Ferdinand? Flowers too cast shadows.

klee circle full

Paul Klee by Paul Eluard – translated by Nancy Kline

f

what is to come

On the death-­dealing slope, the traveler makes use

Of the favor of day, the slippery frost, no small stones,

And eyes blue with love he discovers his season

Be­ringed on all fingers with stars.

white whirl

d

monumental whirl

On the beach the sea has relinquished its ears

And the sand digs the spot for a beautiful crime.

underwater book

n.b.and

Torture is harder for hangmen than victims

Bullets are tears and daggers are signs.

brightly dark

fish

Capital of Pain, Black Widow Press, 2006

translated by Mary Ann Caws, Patricia Terry, Nancy Kline

originally published 1926.

i

I was apprehensive about applying my images to a poem about Paul Klee. Klee is one of my favourite artists for many reasons. He used line masterfully. His sense of colour and texture was both magical and visceral. He was intellectual as well as full of child-like wonder. He experimented imaginatively while rigorously creating an expanding body of work. This poem by Eluard is like a prism capturing various realities & dimensions one might encounter in Klee’s art. I wanted to depict the sensibility & feel of the poem but I wasn’t sure how I felt about making images about somebody who made images. And I didn’t want to copy Klee in any sort of obvious manner. I shared this concern with Nancy Kline, the translator of this poem & many of the poems in Capital of Pain. Nancy suggested that one visual artist interpreting another might be an worthwhile experience yielding interesting results. And with this encouragement in mind I worked on composing images that hopefully come near the boundaries of ‘Klee-ism.’